Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage: empowering health workers to save lives

Misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage: empowering health workers to save lives

By: Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for Health In Senegal, approximately 1,800 women lose their lives every year while giving birth. The major cause of these deaths is uncontrolled bleeding after childbirth, or postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). More than half of Senegalese women live in rural areas and have limited access to well-equipped health facilities that can prevent or treat many of these deaths. Many women give birth,…

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A Garment Originally Made for Astronauts is Saving the Lives of New Mothers in Developing Countries

A Garment Originally Made for Astronauts is Saving the Lives of New Mothers in Developing Countries

By: Ananya Bhattacharya, Editorial Fellow, Quartz n 1969, medical researchers at NASA’s Ames Research Center were referred an unusual patient: a local California woman who had given birth to a healthy baby, but who kept hemorrhaging dangerous amounts of blood. While doctors at Stanford University Hospital gave the hemorrhage patient a blood transfusion, engineers at the space agency brainstormed solutions to stop the bleeding. They decided to try an anti-gravity suit—typically used to keep astronauts…

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How the death of two Ugandan mothers is helping entrench the right to health care

How the death of two Ugandan mothers is helping entrench the right to health care

Moses Mulumba, Ugandan Christian University Sixteen women die in Uganda every day during child birth in instances that could be avoided. Photo credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst When Sylvia Nalubowa went into labour in Uganda’s Mityana district in August 2009, she was taken to a local health centre where she expected to have a normal birth, supervised by a midwife. After she had delivered her first baby the midwife realised there was a twin on the way. The…

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Namibia: Maternity waiting homes protect newborns and mothers

Namibia: Maternity waiting homes protect newborns and mothers

Two years ago, under shade trees in a field adjacent to the Okongo Hospital located in the Ohangwena Region of northern Namibia, 20 to 30 tents housed pregnant women waiting to give birth. Many were here because poor roads, lack of transportation and distances of up to 100 kilometres made it difficult for rural pregnant women to be sure they could reach Okongo Hospital in time to give birth. Life was not easy. “Conditions in…

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